Author Topic: dual master cylinder  (Read 686 times)

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CHS

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2020, 10:15:48 AM »
I had had my 55 converted years ago. The purpose of the dual master is so you do not loose all the brakes. If a wheel cylinder or brake line breaks you still have some brakes. I has this happen with a car years ago. the back brake line blew out, since it was a dual master set up I still had front brakes. Yes it took more time to stop as only two wheels were stopping the car. Fact is I still had brakes!
 

Flathead

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2020, 03:34:34 PM »
Thanks 48,
It's pricey for sure but I thinks it's worth the peace of mind. 

48ply1stcar

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2020, 08:46:50 PM »
ECI Brake system while pricey a lot of people swear by these on the P15-D24.com web site.
http://www.ecihotrodbrakes.com/chrysler_master_assemblies.html
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Flathead

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2020, 01:25:18 PM »
Thank you for all the informative replies.  It's assumed that a broken spring hastened the failure of the flex line.  I had both front springs replaced and replaced any break components, except the master cylinder, that weren't replaced recently. I do feel safe but I cut up cardboard boxes and use them as mats under the car. This makes it easy to detect any new leaks while keeping the floor a little cleaner

TodFitch

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2020, 06:54:54 PM »
A long the line of the comments from "fluid drive", if you had one flex hose fail then it is a pretty good bet that the others are ready to fail too. And if the brake tubing is original, there is a pretty good chance that there are places nearly rusted through from the inside where you can't inspect (DOT 3 brake fluid and the pre-DOT fluids absorb water from the air). Before worrying about a dual master cylinder, I'd replace all the hoses and tubing on the car. You will need to do that to make it safe. And once you do that the odds of failure are pretty small (millions of cars drove billions of miles without brake failure with single master cylinders). Sure, if at that point you still feel unsafe find and install a dual master. But it won't be safe unless the tubing, hoses, etc. are in good condition.

fluid drive

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Re: dual master cylinder
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2020, 03:43:32 PM »
Please bear in mind that a dual cylinder will not prevent the kind of problem you described; I've had complete failures with dual master cylinder cars too. The loss of small amounts of fluid from a wheel cylinder or other causes may be less dangerous with a dual cylinder but a catastrophic failure like a flex hose or brake line will still lead to the same conclusion. Far too many people do not thoroughly rebuild their entire braking system and that's an even more dangerous situation.


Flathead

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dual master cylinder
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2019, 11:52:24 AM »
Anyone know about dual master cylinder conversions?  I have a 51 and recently had a flex hose break  I had my wife in the car and it scared the heck out of both of us. I couldn't find a conversion kit for my car. Any ideas would be appreciated.

 

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